WHERE TO FROM NOW NATALIE ?  " I HAVE A FACEBOOK PAGE CALLED  - Our Green LADY "

THE SKY IS YOUR LIMIT !! COME ON SOUTH AFRICA AND THE REST OF THE WORLD - STAND UP AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE BY PARTNERING WITH NATALIE.

 POSSIBLE BUSINESS PLAN : WHO IS KEEN TO PARTNER NATALIE ? 

 (CONTACT DETAILS:  NATALIE E. ROWLES   Cell No. 073 171 5883  Tel. No. 031 7024293  e-mail: awrowles@mweb.co.za)

 

1.  LAND

2.  NATALIE HAS THE SEEDS AND THE SYSTEMS

3.  WE NEED A CORPORATE OR GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT FROM ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD TO SPEND THEIR MONEY ON MAKING A DIFFERENCE TO AN AREA BY      GROWING A FOREST.

4.  THESE CARBON SAVINGS CAN THEN BE OFFSET AND MARKETED TO YOUR CONSUMERS AND WHO KNOWS EVEN TRADED DOWN THE LINE FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL. 

 

WITH NATALIE YOU CAN GROW YOUR OWN CORPORATE FOREST  - SHE WILL SHOW YOU HOW

 

WHO AT COP17 IS GOING TO TAKE UP THIS CHALLENGE?

 

DHL TRANSPORT COMPANY HAS ALREADY SPONSORED NATALIE WITH TRANSPORTATION OF TREES  - THANK YOU!

Picture above is my Mail & Guardian Award for Greening the Future where I got
second place = first place went to Mandela Bay Municipality - their NGO who
helped with managing Waste in Township etc. and thirdly another NGO.
Endangered Wildlife Trust.

Natalie would never say it but we can : This was without the millions some had at their disposal.

Imagine what Natalie can do for you with your corporate / government funding . Grow your corporate sustainable forest today !  

Above Award I’ve received on the 2nd August 2011 in Donnybrook at the DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURE, ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS & RURAL DEVELOPMENT  ‘W OMEN IN ENVIRONMENT’ SUMMIT 2011 for the category ‘ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION’.

 

USING  THE  POWER  OF  GRASS

FOR  VEGETABLE  GROWING

By:  Natalie E. Rowles

METHOD:

1.         Place newly mowed lawn-grass cuttings in a bucket.  Fill bucket with water.

            Leave for half an hour – stir grass around in the bucket so all contents are wet.

 2.         Take +- 40cm deep and a large plastic toy box or a round tub.  Drill holes in the middle of the base.

 3.         Buy enough fibre glass mosquito net material from any hardware store.

            Fold it double and place toy box on top of it.   Draw the outline of the shape of toy box with a Koki pen onto the net. 

            Cut it out and place it in the bottom of the toy box or round tub.

4.         Place this toy box/tub on two cement blocks in a sunny spot and fill it with the wet grass cuttings to the brim of the toy box/tub.
           
Level it by pushing down the grass cuttings with the lid or another basket etc.  It now has the effect of a
wet sponge.
           
Put some more grass cuttings in and do the same again, so the grass will reach close to the brim of the toy box/tub.

 5.         Sow about half a packet of bush beans seeds or other vegetable seeds on top of the  grass.

            Cover the seeds with another layer of wet grass cuttings.  Push it lightly down to make it level, using the lid or another basket.

            Water it lightly  to remove the air pockets formed around the seeds.

           Cover it with the toy box lid or another container, to keep it dark and prevent rain falling and disturbing the seeds. 

6.         After a week remove the lid or basket as the seedlings should appear now.

            To prevent Hadedah birds from pulling out seedlings, place a “cage” of metal lawn borders around and on top of the toy box/tub.

 7.         Water lightly every other day if the grass is drying out.

 8.         After two weeks, place 40 composting earthworms inside the toy box/tub to turn the grass cuttings into top soil.


9.         Six weeks after sowing the beans, you should be able to harvest the young beans every day.  Pick always when very young.

10.       Keep a few bush beans plants for growing own organic seeds, so do not pick

            green beans from them.  Leave them to form seeds and harvest seeds when  beans are starting to turn brown and becoming dry.

 11.       Let the pods dry out in the shade on a piece of shade-net material – harvest and place the dried seeds later in a glass bottle which has a piece of charcoal at the bottom and covered by a clean piece of paper.  Seeds should be mixed with wood ash to preserve it for a longer time if necessary to do so. 

 

This lady has not only personally grown and distributed over 3000 indigenous Yellowwood trees, over a period of six years, but has also produced succulent veggies from grass cuttings and worm farming over a 16-year period as well.  Natalie also makes her own hot water geysers and solar cookers !! eish !!  The solar geysers gets to over 60 degrees C !!  The cost to produce a solar geyser as below is approximately R5000  + transport and installation .

How many trees and veggies do you think Natalie could cultivate with corporate funding ?

This lady not only makes a differnce with growing veggies with grass cutting and worm fertilizer and grow and distributes yellowood trees but makes her own hot water geyser for 2000 rand

AND NOW NATALIE HAS INVENTED HER OWN SOLAR COOKER  !!   (STILL IN PROTOTYPE STAGE)

Natalie Rowles   
If you think that not many sustainability measures can be done individually, you haven’t seen Natalie Rowles’ garden.  Her yard in Pinetown is full of container gardens, organic vegetables, and seedlings for reforestation projects. She grows everything from herbs to potatoes to yellowwood trees, all of which are grown sustainably, using a number of methods and devices Natalie has designed herself. 

Natalie’s gardens are made from simple, often reused, materials: concrete blocks, storage containers, plastic crates, even old tyres.  She grows all her plants and vegetables organically using homemade soil made using earthworms. She has even put together a simple method for starting vegetable gardens using only grass clippings and forty composting worms. (Instructions are below.)

Natalie has made a personal commitment to save energy and water usage through a number of innovative and successful designs; she uses a large rainwater harvesting tank to water her gardens, and she has devised a solar water geyser that only needs two hours to heat gallons of hot water for her home. She is keen to promote this geyser throughout communities in eThekwini. Her newest experiment is an “ubuntu” fridge, a clay pot that keeps contents cool even in high heat.

No stranger to difficult times herself as a child, Natalie is very committed to focusing on the social benefits of sustainable gardening.  Home vegetable gardens can serve as a way for low-income families to bolster food security and save on the cost of fresh produce.  “My mission is to help create a greener KwaZulu Natal and to encourage people to start their own food gardens, train people in food gardening, and alleviate poverty and hunger.”

Natalie is happy to have visitors to her garden to learn more about worm composting, growing plants and vegetables, container gardens, her hot water geyser, rainwater tank, or ubuntu fridge.  She is also available to speak to groups throughout eThekwini Municipality about how to start their own vegetable gardens.

Please visit Natalie’s website at www.ecoworms.iwarp.com, or contact her at 073 171 5883 and ecoworms@gmail.com
 
Using the Power of Grass for Vegetable Growing (by Natalie Rowles)

Materials needed:

Large plastic toy box or round tub ~40cm deep (blue-coloured boxes deter birds and insects) 
Grass cuttings
Fiberglass mosquito netting
Two cement blocks
Vegetable Seeds (beans are particularly good)
Bucket of water
40 composting worms
Method:

Place freshly mowed grass cuttings in a bucket.  Fill bucket with water and leave for 30 minutes – stir grass around so all contents are wet.  
Take a large plastic toy box or round tub that is ~40cm deep.  Drill holes in the middle of the base for drainage. 
Buy enough fiberglass mosquito net from any hardware store. Fold it double, and cut to the size and shape of the toy box.  Place it in the bottom of the toy box or round tub.
Place the tub on two cement blocks (to give some room between the pot and the ground). 
Fill the tub with the wet grass cuttings to the brim of the toy box/tub.  Level it by pushing down the grass cuttings with the lid or another basket (it should now have the effect of a wet sponge).  Put more grass cuttings in and do the same again, so the grass will reach close to the brim of the toy box/tub. 
Sow about a packet of bush beans or other vegetable seeds, on top of the grass.  Cover the seeds with another layer of wet grass cuttings, and gently push it down to be level with the lid.  Cover the tub with the lid or another basket to keep it dark and prevent rainfall from disturbing the seeds. Water very lightly to displace any air pockets. 
After a week, remove the lid or basket as the seedlings should appear now. To prevent Hadedahs from pulling out seedlings, place a “cage” of metal lawn borders around and on top of the tub. 
Water very lightly every day if the grass is drying out.  
After two weeks, place 40 composting earthworms inside the tub to turn the grass cuttings into top soil.  
Six weeks after sowing the beans, you should be able to harvest the young beans every day.  Pick always when very young. 
Keep a few bush bean plants for growing your own organic seeds.  Do not pick the green beans from them – leave them to form seeds and then harvest the seeds when the beans are starting to turn brown and become dry. 
Let the pods dry out in the shade on a piece of shade-net material.  Harvest and place the dried seeds in a glass bottle which has a piece of charcoal at the bottom and cover it with a clean piece of paper.  Seeds can be mixed with wood ash to preserve it for a longer time if necessary to do so.

http://ecoworms.iwarp.com/

 Natalies latest creation  : For the mobile person - it can be taken apart and runs on very little energy (anything that burns and with great ventilation)